Browsing Category

books

Writing Update

books, Holidays, Romance, Writing Update

In April, a pipe burst and flooded more than half of our house. I am thrilled to say that (much as I love our contractor and his crew) the last worker left this afternoon, and the work is done! It will be a bit easier to write without the sweet sounds of nail guns and wet saws—not to mention being relegated to my great room dining table because my office was in the flood zone.

Nevertheless, I have powered through and completed a book. The Wanderer is with the editor now, and on target for a September 20 release. I’m especially pleased with this final book of the Highland Soldiers series, as I hope readers will be.

I’m now beginning a new project that I’m very excited about. I’m finally writing the Christmas story I’ve wanted to do for some time. Watch for it this Christmas season!

The Christmas Cabin Cover

Fairy Tales Could Be Older Than You Ever Imagined

books

Via  | smithsonianmag.com | Smithsonian

Jack may have been climbing that beanstalk for more than 5,000 years

A few hundred years ago, fairy tale auteurs like the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen and Charles Perrault helped bring magical tales of princesses, evil ogres, dark forests, weird spells and thwarted love into the storybooks—and to the bedsides—of children, everywhere. But how old are the tales they transcribed? A new study suggests that their origins go all the way back to prehistory.

In a new study published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, a folklorist and anthropologist say that stories like Rumpelstiltskin and Jack and the Beanstalk are much older than originally thought. Instead of dating from the 1500s, the researchers say that some of these classic stories are 4,000 and 5,000 years old, respectively. This contradicts previous speculation that story collectors like the Brothers Grimm were relaying tales that were only a few hundred years old.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonianmag/fairy-tales-could-be-older-ever-imagined-180957882/#1C52PJEYphMEgXHd.99

SaveSave

Yew sets ancient tone of burial ground

books, Research, UK History, Writers
Yews in churchyards may point to pre-Christian beliefs in the sacred. Photograph: Matthew L. Tagney

Yews in churchyards may point to pre-Christian beliefs in the sacred. Photograph: Matthew L. Tagney

It might be thought that when Thomas Hardy stepped aside from his narrative in Jude The Obscure to describe Shaston, or Shaftesbury, “on the summit of a steep and imposing scarp, rising … out of the deep alluvial vale of Blackmoor” as “one of the queerest and quaintest spots in England”, he was being unduly fanciful.

But if, today, you turn aside from St John’s Hill, close to that summit, in to a small enclosed space beside the road and take in the sight of the ancient yew before you, its limbs spreading out wide and close to the ground above scattered headstones, then look ahead towards the sheer drop into the expanse of the vale, you do catch a sense of the local magic and feel you are indeed in a special place.

 

Via The Guardian: http://gu.com/p/4fe4d/stw

War & Peace; great, but has anyone read it? Not the cast of the new BBC production

books, Costume Dramas

 

War & Peace, which took more than two years to make and included filming in three countries, brings together a crop of the finest young acting talent to play characters whose lives are turned upside down by impact of Napoleonic expansionism on Tsarist Russia Photo: BBC

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/12078324/War-and-Peace-great-but-has-anyone-read-it-Not-the-cast-of-the-new-BBC-production.html  | via @Telegraph

J.L. JARVIS